Category Archives: Dissemination, distributions and discovery

What was done, how, are there any figures? Concepts and process behind the dissemination, uptake, and wider adoption of the e-textbooks.

Embedding Using Primary Sources in the Liverpool Curriculum

This blog post was written by Emma Thompson, Education Lead, University of Liverpool Library. Using Primary Sources (UPS) was published 18 months ago, and we now have one full academic year of usage. Where did that time go? During the 2017/18 academic year Using Primary Sources has been established as key reading here in Liverpool … Read more

Institution as e-textbook publisher toolkit launch event

        The Jisc Institution as e-textbook publisher project was a four-year project investigating the viability of higher education institutions publishing their own e-textbooks. The overall objective of the programme, which started in 2014, was to assess whether the textbooks that have been created provide: A more affordable higher education for students Better … Read more

The eTIPS companion websites – supporting learning and teaching through institutionally published work

Written by Laurence Patterson. The eTIPS project, sponsored by Jisc, is a collaboration between The University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), and Edinburgh Napier University (ENU). eTIPS saw two eTextbooks authored, formatted, and completed by academics and others. The two eTIPS eTexts published offer universal interest for undergraduates and postgraduates, discussing student preparedness for … Read more

Textbook Marketing

This blog post was written by Alison Fox, Marketing and Distribution Manager, UCL Press. UCL Press published two open access e-textbooks with Jisc as part of the ‘Institution as e-textbook publisher project’. Textbook of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was in June 2016, and Key Concepts in Public Archaeology in September 2017. To the end of … Read more

Dissemination and wider uptake of Using Primary Sources

This blog post was written by Alison Welsby, Editorial Director at Liverpool University Press. As discussed in previous blog posts, Using Primary Sources is an Open Access teaching and study resource that combines rare archival source material with high quality peer-reviewed chapters by leading academics. One of the main reasons to publish the e-textbook was … Read more

Authors motivations for writing e-textbooks

This blog post was written by Professor Frank Rennie, University of the Highlands and Islands. There was no single motivation to engage with this institutional e-publishing process, but among the range of perceived benefits, the idea of being able to get our own academic ideas available quickly and inexpensively out to students was certainly a … Read more

Dissemination, distribution and discovery of e-textbooks

This blog post was written by Alison Fox, Marketing and Distribution Manager, UCL Press. UCL press published two open access e-textbooks with Jisc as part of the ‘Institution as e-textbook publisher project’. The first was Textbook of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Published in June 2016, content from this book was downloaded 23,067 times in 156 … Read more

Future opportunities for e-textbooks to be used by other HE and FE institutions

This blog post was written by Steve Stapleton, University of Nottingham. This is an introductory blog post that will be discussed in detail in another blog post in May 2018. One of the last things that we need to do as part of the project at Nottingham is to investigate the potential for our two … Read more

Internal Distribution and Promotion of eTIPS eTextbooks

This blog post was written by Laurence Patterson, Edinburgh Napier University. The eTIPS project, sponsored by Jisc, is a collaboration between The University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), and Edinburgh Napier University (ENU). eTIPS saw two eTextbooks authored, formatted, and completed by academics and others. A fundamental objective of the project was to take … Read more

Marketing engagement and creativity

This blog post was written by Emily Felton, Marketing Assistant, Liverpool University Press. One of the foremost principles in academic books marketing is to ensure that the research of an author gets the exposure it deserves. Publishing within the academic markets of the humanities and social sciences ensures that we often encounter some of the … Read more